Posts Tagged ‘Freddie Mac’

housing-rebound

Many of you are seeing it in the field: Low inventory, houses flying off the market and a groundswell of demand from buyers. As a result, home prices are steadily increasing.

Combine all those factors with signs of strength in the economy, and you have a recipe for another market change: higher mortgage rates.

The average for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage jumped to 4.29 percent in early July—nearly a whole percentage point above where it was in early May, according to Freddie Mac.

While some industry watchers predict that rising rates could stall the positive momentum in housing’s recovery, I tend to agree with the school of thought that says the rebound will continue despite upward ticks over time.

Rates are still historically low compared to what they were before the recession hit, and prices are still affordable in many areas.

Will some home-buyers see a decrease in their buying power if rates climb too far, particularly young, first-timers or low-income families? Unfortunately, yes.

But it won’t affect all buyers.

Recent data reported by the MBA notes that although we’re seeing slight dips in overall mortgage applications as rates increase, conventional home loan applications are picking up by a few percentage points.

This indicates two things: 1) people with steady incomes and employment, a sizeable down payment, and strong credit are finally coming off the sidelines to buy before rates go up further; and 2) many of these borrowers are more than likely move-up or repeat buyers who saw the equity return to their homes and were able to finally sell so they could make their next move.

Recent data reported by the MBA notes that although we’re seeing slight dips in overall mortgage applications as rates increase, conventional home loan applications are picking up by a few percentage points.

Perhaps you know of potential buyers who have been waiting for the bottom of the market. If what we’re seeing is any indication, the bottom has come and gone. We’re in a steady recovery, and now’s the time to encourage those would-be buyers to explore their options. It’s worth noting, though, that home prices and mortgage rates could go up more as demand continues to outpace existing supply and new construction.

These recent market shifts are an opportunity for you to shine a spotlight on your professional expertise, as well as employ creative marketing strategies to communicate these trends to your entire database of contacts. Use local and national statistics to show them what’s happening in real estate.

If you know of potential buyers who’ve been waiting it out, tell them what’s going on in frank terms, then connect them with a trusted lender who will show them what their monthly payment might look like at the current mortgage rate for a property within their price, as well as a comparison of what it might be if rates reach 5 percent or more. Seeing the numbers in black and white could be the impetus indecisive buyers need to make their big move.

It’s natural for some people to panic a little when they see home prices and mortgage rates make big jumps, but it’s an inevitable part of the crests and troughs of a housing cycle. Remind home-buyers and sellers of your value by giving them the facts without the frills. With the right approach, you’ll help get those buyers and sellers off the sidelines and back into the game.

For more information regarding mortgage rates or your housing needs contact us at adim@rochesterhomesplus.com

Existing-home sales improved in May and remain solidly above a year ago, while the median price continued to rise by double-digit rates from a year earlier, according to the National Association of Realtors®.

Total existing-home sales1, which are completed transactions that include single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, rose 4.2 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.18 million in May from 4.97 million in April, and is 12.9 percent above the 4.59 million-unit pace in May 2012.

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, said the recovery is strengthening and to expect limited housing supplies for the balance of the year in much of the country.  “The housing numbers are overwhelmingly positive.  However, the number of available homes is unlikely to grow, despite a nice gain in May, unless new home construction ramps up quickly by an additional 50 percent,” he said.  “The home price growth is too fast, and only additional supply from new homebuilding can moderate future price growth.”

Existing-home sales are at the highest level since November 2009 when the market jumped to 5.44 million as buyers took advantage of tax stimulus.  Sales have stayed above year-ago levels for 23 months, while the national median price shows 15 consecutive months of year-over-year increases.

Total housing inventory at the end of May rose 3.3 percent to 2.22 million existing homes available for sale, which represents a 5.1-month supply2 at the current sales pace, down from 5.2 months in April.  Listed inventory is 10.1 percent below a year ago, when there was a 6.5-month supply.

The national median existing-home price3 for all housing types was $208,000 in May, up 15.4 percent from May 2012.  This marks six straight months of double-digit increases and is the strongest price gain since October 2005, which jumped a record 16.6 percent from a year earlier.  The last time there were 15 consecutive months of year-over-year price increases was from March 2005 to May 2006.

Distressed homes4 – foreclosures and short sales – accounted for 18 percent of May sales, unchanged from April, but matching the lowest share since monthly tracking began in October 2008; they were 25 percent in May 2012.  Fewer distressed homes, which generally sell at a discount, account for some of the price gain.

Eleven percent of May sales were foreclosures, and 7 percent were short sales.  Foreclosures sold for an average discount of 15 percent below market value in May, while short sales were discounted 12 percent.

According to Freddie Mac, the national average commitment rate for a 30-year, conventional, fixed-rate mortgage rose to 3.54 percent in May from 3.45 percent in April; it was 3.80 percent in May 2012.

NAR President Gary Thomas, broker-owner of Evergreen Realty in Villa Park, Calif., said market conditions today are vastly different than during the housing boom.  “The boom period was marked by easy credit and overbuilding, but today we have tight mortgage credit and widespread shortages of homes for sale,” he said.

“The issue now is pent-up demand and strong growth in the number of households, with buyer traffic 29 percent above a year ago, coinciding with several years of inadequate housing construction.  These conditions are contributing to sustainable price growth,” Thomas said.

The median time on market for all homes was 41 days in May, down from 46 days in April, and is 43 percent faster than the 72 days on market in May 2012.  Short sales were on the market for a median of 79 days, while foreclosures typically sold in 43 days and non-distressed homes took 39 days.

Forty-five percent of all homes sold in May were on the market for less than a month.  The median time on the market is the shortest since monthly tracking began in May 2011; on an annual basis, a separate NAR survey of home buyers and sellers shows the shortest selling time was 4 weeks in both 2004 and 2005.

First-time buyers accounted for 28 percent of purchases in May, compared with 29 percent in April and 34 percent in May 2012.

All-cash sales were at 33 percent of transactions in May, up from 32 percent in April and 28 percent in May 2012.  Individual investors, who account for many cash sales, purchased 18 percent of homes in May; they were 19 percent in April and 17 percent in May 2012.

Single-family home sales rose 5.0 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.60 million in May from 4.38 million in April, and are 12.7 percent higher than the 4.08 million-unit pace in May 2012.  The median existing single-family home price was $208,700 in May, up 15.8 percent above a year ago, the strongest increase since October 2005 when it jumped 16.9 percent from a year earlier.

Existing condominium and co-op sales slipped 1.7 percent to an annualized rate of 580,000 units in May from 590,000 in April, but are 13.7 percent above the 510,000-unit level a year ago.  The median existing condo price was $202,100 in May, which is 11.8 percent above May 2012.

Regionally, existing-home sales in the Northeast rose 1.6 percent to an annual rate of 650,000 in May and are 8.3 percent above May 2012.  The median price in the Northeast was $269,600, up 12.3 percent from a year ago.

Existing-home sales in the Midwest jumped 8.0 percent in May to a pace of 1.21 million, and are 16.3 percent higher than a year ago.  The median price in the Midwest was $159,800, up 8.2 percent from May 2012.

In the South, existing-home sales rose 4.0 percent to an annual level of 2.09 million in May and are 16.1 percent above May 2012.  The median price in the South was $183,300, which is 15.0 percent above a year ago.

Existing-home sales in the West increased 2.5 percent to a pace of 1.23 million in May and are 7.0 percent above a year ago.  With the tightest regional supply, the median price in the West was $276,400, up 19.9 percent from May 2012.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.  For additional commentary and consumer information, visitwww.houselogic.com and http://retradio.com.

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NOTE:  For local information, please contact the local association of Realtors® for data from local multiple listing services.  Local MLS data is the most accurate source of sales and price information in specific areas, although there may be differences in reporting methodology.

1Existing-home sales, which include single-family, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, are based on transaction closings from Multiple Listing Services.  Changes in sales trends outside of MLSs are not captured in the monthly series.  NAR rebenchmarks home sales periodically using other sources to assess overall home sales trends, including sales not reported by MLSs.

Existing-home sales, based on closings, differ from the U.S. Census Bureau’s series on new single-family home sales, which are based on contracts or the acceptance of a deposit.  Because of these differences, it is not uncommon for each series to move in different directions in the same month.  In addition, existing-home sales, which account for more than 90 percent of total home sales, are based on a much larger data sample – about 40 percent of multiple listing service data each month – and typically are not subject to large prior-month revisions.

The annual rate for a particular month represents what the total number of actual sales for a year would be if the relative pace for that month were maintained for 12 consecutive months.  Seasonally adjusted annual rates are used in reporting monthly data to factor out seasonal variations in resale activity.  For example, home sales volume is normally higher in the summer than in the winter, primarily because of differences in the weather and family buying patterns.  However, seasonal factors cannot compensate for abnormal weather patterns.

Single-family data collection began monthly in 1968, while condo data collection began quarterly in 1981; the series were combined in 1999 when monthly collection of condo data began.  Prior to this period, single-family homes accounted for more than nine out of 10 purchases.  Historic comparisons for total home sales prior to 1999 are based on monthly single-family sales, combined with the corresponding quarterly sales rate for condos.

2Total inventory and month’s supply data are available back through 1999, while single-family inventory and month’s supply are available back to 1982 (prior to 1999, single-family sales accounted for more than 90 percent of transactions and condos were measured only on a quarterly basis).

3The median price is where half sold for more and half sold for less; medians are more typical of market conditions than average prices, which are skewed higher by a relatively small share of upper-end transactions. The only valid comparisons for median prices are with the same period a year earlier due to a seasonality in buying patterns.  Month-to-month comparisons do not compensate for seasonal changes, especially for the timing of family buying patterns.  Changes in the composition of sales can distort median price data.  Year-ago median and mean prices sometimes are revised in an automated process if additional data is received.

The national median condo/co-op price often is higher than the median single-family home price because condos are concentrated in higher-cost housing markets.  However, in a given area, single-family homes typically sell for more than condos as seen in NAR’s quarterly metro area price reports.

4Distressed sales (foreclosures and short sales), days on market, first-time buyers, all-cash transactions and investors are from a monthly survey for the NAR’s Realtors® Confidence Index, posted at Realtor.org.

The Pending Home Sales Index for May will be released June 27 and existing-home sales for June is scheduled for July 22; release times are 10:00 a.m. EDT.

(MoneyWatch) Fannie Mae (FNMA) and Freddie Mac (FMCC), along with some of the nation’s biggest lenders, said Monday that they will suspend some foreclosures during the holidays.

From Dec. 19 through Jan. 2, 2013, Fannie will halt evictions of homeowners in a single-family property and in apartments with up to four units that are financed by a mortgage from the government-sponsored enterprise. Freddie, the nation’s other main provider of government-backed housing loans, will stop foreclosures for the same the type of homes from Dec. 17 through Jan. 2, 2013.

JPMorgan Chase (JPM) and Citigroup (C) said in statements that they also are temporarily ceasing foreclosures. JPMorgan said it would suspend all evictions beginning Dec. 19 through Jan. 1; Citi did not specify dates for its suspension.

Mixed news for homeowners facing foreclosure
Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac suspend foreclosures in storm-hit areas
Government suspending some foreclosures in Northeast because of Sandy
Fannie Mae announced on Monday that the agency is halting foreclosure evictions in support of families who have faced financial challenges. “The holidays are a chance to be with loved ones and we want to relieve some stress at this time of year,” said Terry Edwards, an executive vice president in Fannie Mae’s credit management division, in a statement.

Edwards said borrowers who are struggling with their house payments should contact Fannie as soon as possible.

Although the news is likely to bring a measure of relief to homeowners at imminent risk of eviction, the respite will be brief. Freddie noted that firms that handle evictions for the company will continue filing foreclosure documents, such as default notices, so evictions can resume after January 2 of next year.

Fannie and Freddie, which finance the housing market by purchasing mortgages from lenders, are government-owned. They were seized by federal authorities in 2008 after the agencies suffered massive financial losses stemming from the housing crash.

Following superstorm Sandy, both agencies said that they would suspend evictions and foreclosures in affected areas for 90 days. For borrowers with a Fannie loan, that foreclosure moratorium will last through Feb. 1, 2013, while for Freddie customers the suspension lasts through next February.

The Federal Housing Administration in November also halted foreclosures on federally insured homes in storm-hit areas of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island.

Foreclosure activity has fallen in recent months. According to real estate research firm CoreLogic, 58,000 foreclosures were completed in October, down 17 percent from the year-ago period.

Still, foreclosures remain elevated. Between 2000 and 2006, when the bubble in housing prices started to deflate, an average of roughly 21,000 foreclosures were completed each year. Roughly 1.3 million homes, or 3.2 percent of all properties with a mortgage, were in some process of foreclosure as of October, down from 1.5 million in the same period last year, according to the firm.