Posts Tagged ‘Painting Your Home’


When putting a house on the market it’s common for sellers to invest in home repairs, but what most sells don’t know is that not every repair adds significant market value. Indeed it’s far too common for uneducated sellers to spend thousands of dollars on “important” renovations only to discover that these new features will not increase their potential selling price at all. But since RE/MAX Plus is committed to ensuring that our customers receive the most return on their investments, we have put together a few suggestions for value-conscious repairs and renovations that home owners can do to increase their resale value, all without breaking the bank. Keep in mind this list is only a general guide, so if you are truly interested in learning what repairs will generate the most value for your home, contact a RE/MAX Plus agent today!

  1. Get Expert Advice
    Before you even pick up a paint brush, one of the most cost-effective methods of adding value to your renovations is to hire a professional contractor, designer or real estate agent to inspect your home. These people will always have the latest knowledge on the current trends and can help you develop a renovation plan that suits your budget while maximizing value. Many of these experts offer free estimates, but even for the ones that charge a small fee, it’s hard to put a price on a plan of action.
  2. Have a Painting Party
    Arguably the least-expensive method to add instant value to your home, painting walls and ceilings is a simple task you can do yourself or with family. For around $50 a room, sellers can create a clean, updated look that draws the eye and helps buyers better picture what it would be like to live there themselves. Keep in mind that neutral colors such as beige or white will appeal to the greatest number of people, making it that much more desirable for a larger percentage of the population.
  3. Clean EVERYTHING
    Last but certainly not least, never underestimate the selling power of a freshly-washed window or a sparkling floor. Dirt, grime, and dust sends a general message of disrepair and dampens the selling potential, even in a home with no other issues. Pay particular attention to the threshold of entry doors, windows, bathrooms, and kitchens as these are places prone to heavy soil levels. For a professional touch, consider renting a commercial steam or carpet cleaner to remove deep stains and scuffs.

The Worst Colors to Use in a Home

paint-samplesEmerald may be this year’s color of the year and hot hue, but which colors should you avoid?

Color research tells us some colors to avoid. Colors that can be considered, as some researchers note, “eye irritants” and can even cause headaches or mess with your vision.

According to color research, the worst offending color:

Yellow as a “pure bright lemon.”

“More light is reflected by bright colors, resulting in excessive stimulation of the eyes,” researchers note. “Yellow is an eye irritant. Babies cry more in yellow rooms, husbands and wives fight more in yellow kitchens, and opera singers throw more tantrums in yellow dressing rooms.”

That said, yellow is the first color the human eye tends to notice so in small doses it may be effective. It can help you draw attention to an item when used as an accent color. Also, using yellow in softer tints or in small quantities may not be such a turn-off.

A recent article at Homesessive.com (“Paint Color Trends to Avoid”) pinpointed trendy color combos that may have once been a turn-on that are now becoming a turn-off in home interiors. San Francisco color expert Kelly Berg recently weighed in at Homesessive.com about some trendy color combinations to avoid, such as:

  • “Greige”: The gray and beige combo in a space to create a monochromatic effect. Instead, Berg recommends pulling in some accent colors, likegrassy greens, to make the space more warm and inviting. She also recommends mixing in reflective surfaces, such as glass and metal, to lighten up the room since gray tends to absorb more light than other hues.
  • Chocolate brown and blue: This trendy color combo of a chocolate brown and Tiffany’s blue may be growing tiresome in home interiors. Berg recommends freshening up the look by adding a third color to the mix, such as hot pink, coral, or metallics in silver or gold.
  • Red, Gold and Green: This go-to rustic color pattern also may be beginning to grow stale in interiors. Berg recommends avoiding using all three colors in equal portions when you have a tri-color scheme in a home. She also recommends keeping the saturation levels of the color similar, but not exactly the same to liven up the look.
  • The all white kitchen: A kitchen all in white can look fresh and clean, but the look may be getting overdone and growing dull. Liven it up by pulling in some color from an adjacent space or pull a color from the dishes, Berg says. For example, if the home owner has blue dishes, you might try using deep indigo as an accent color.

Have you found any color combos that are big turn-offs in a space? Weigh in on what you think works–and doesn’t–with color!